THE EFFECT OF EGG POWDER ON INTRADERMAL CARRAGEENAN INJECTION OF FEMALE BEAGLES

Jeffrey Hunchar, D. V. M.

Background:

Intradermal injection of carrageenan results in significant inflammatory responses in the majority of challenged dogs. Ibuprofen reduces by 50% the inflammatory response caused by the injections of carrageenan.

 

Study Design:

A total of 20 dogs (Canis familaiaris) were divided into four groups of n=5 and fed their designated diets for 14 weeks. Ten animals were fed a basal control diet, 5 animals consumed 3.5 g of immune egg powder in addition to their basic diets and 5 animals recieved 35.0 g of hyperimmune egg powder in their diet. 

 

After consuming these diets for approximately 14 weeks the controls (no egg), were divided into groups 1 and 2. The other two groups were designated as Group 3 (3.5 g of immune egg), and Group 4 (35 g of immune egg). In addition, Group 2 (no egg) dogs were administered ibuprofen prior to their carrageenan injections. This group served as the standard for the results of carrageenan stimulation. The diameter of injection sites was measured by calipers.

 

Results:

Daily consumption of either 3.5 g or 35.0 g of immune egg powder for 14 weeks resulted in a reduction in the size of carrageenan-stimulated sites as compared to dogs on diet without immune egg. The activity of the egg powder was equivalent to that seen with oral administration of ibuprofen.